Thursday, September 23, 2010

Dumping Of The God

















8 comments:

  1. Long Live Hinduism in BHUTAN.After all Bhutan is a Mixed culture where even Hindu exist.

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  2. I went through your article. Please dont talk so filthily of another religion. After all, the constitution of Bhutan provides for the practice of one's faith freely. I think the Hindu community will get a serious blow by your article.

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  3. I totally agree with what you have written. I am Hindu too. You can write what is there and the fact what we see. But reading your article did not make me feel that you are a person who loves the environment. There was no passion in the writing. Because if you had concern for environment you would never interfere in the way the hindu do with the idol but only what they do. There are vast difference. I am a environmentalist too and I understand. Let me point one of the many things you have written that made me feel that way:

    "Have you considered that these toxic materials finally end up inside the bellies of fish that we eat?"

    If you were in love with the environment you would not even think yo write this line. It is not what environment lovers write. Did you in any case think about the fish that eats the toxic things. You wrote about yourself and the farmers. Not a single line is about the water and the aquatic beings being harmed. If you are a true environment lover then dont eat fish or meat. If you are a true environment lover then you should write about the way Bhutanese eat meat. Why do we write about what we see directly only. Why is Bhutan banning tobacco and not alcohol. People die from alcohol more than tobacco. There are lots that are too be written.
    Writers never write in the way they hate others but they like to make them understand what is wrong.
    Living beings are the same. Weather a person is being killed or an ox for me it is the same. I have nothing to do with your writing for Hindu. For me Hindu and Buddhist are brother. I hardly differentiate between them. Eating meet in the ceremonies like puja is what I dont like in Buddhist other I love it.

    So we should think broadly. Love all to save environment....

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  4. i am so happy that you are so concerned about the enviroment being polluted and so on and so forth due to the celebration of hindu festivals. i am specifying it as hindu festivals because i am sure that u would not deny that according to bhutanese tradition the offering of sang(sandal wood) during the puja time pollutes our enviroment more than those in vishwakarma puja.
    another thing is the prayer flags. every yr more than 1000s and 1000s of trees are cut down to be used as prayer flags. i think u have never thought of it. i guess its not always right to look into others and comment. u have to see the both side of the coin. we have learned in dzongkha that its easy to see others fault but hard of our own.

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  5. Awesome pictures which unfortunately belie what they entail. I don’t see this article or the pictures as against any religion. They just state what is as it is. I believe prayer flag poles are cut through certain regulations so this would not be harming the environment. Pray, how does burning sang contribute to pollution ? Sang is not made of artificial material. Coming back to the point, everyone should be objective and see the concern expressed on the pollution to our rivers and offer suggestions rather than being defensive and throwing all kinds of accusations. Another festival that I am wary of is the bursting of firecrackers during Diwali strictly for security reasons (forget pollution). As long as the firecrackers are used in the vicinity of one’s homes/area it is fine, but once they start throwing “pattakas” as popularly known helter skelter it becomes dangerous to lives and property.

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  6. I am happy that I didn't decorate my car that day, but I did go for puja because I love it. I even went for dancing in the evening.
    Yeshey you are so write about everything, we need to rethink a lot of things there- not necessarily opposing the hindu sentiments like some Anonymous chaps feel...

    I personally don't pay any attention to people who write anonymously... but suddenly the 4th one caught my attention... really what about the prayer flags and the sang?

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  7. Dear PaSsu,

    I seem to have missed out on your above post.

    Regarding the prayer flag poles, let me assure you that the felling of the young trees will have no impact on the forest stand.

    As you know, people are not allowed to cut down flag poles as and when they want and wherever they want it from. Its felling and extraction is regulated. The marking of the poles by the Forestry officials follow a certain Silvicultural rules and conventions.

    In fact, you should know that selective felling of young trees (a form of culling) is essential for the healthy growth of the forest stand. Forestry Department do it on purpose - I mean cutting down young trees in order that those that are left standing has a better chance at healthier growth.

    Regarding polluting the atmosphere with sandal wood sang - I dont know what the reader is referring to - we do not have sandal wood in Bhutan.

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